24
Apr

Israel’s Top 10 Cult Foods

(Photo: flickr/galitlub)

(Photo: flickr/galitlub)

Every culture and place has its own beloved and unique foods, and Israel is no different. The Jewish Week’s Nirit Yadin and Ayelet Ben-Zvi take a look at 10 of the quirky and delicious foods that you’ll find–and enjoy–in Israel:

Bamba—Take a walk by the beach, a playground, or even a parking lot in Israel, and you’ll spot kids of all ages holding on to their Bamba bag for dear life. The yellow, crunchy, airy corn puffs that melt in the mouth into a salty-sweet, peanut-y cream is probably the most classic Israeli snack. No wonder, then that it is one of the first words Israeli babies utter: “Imma, Abba, Bamba.”

Gvina Levana —This spreadable fresh cheese, literally, “white cheese,” is the cornerstone of the celebrated Israeli breakfast. Pita bread, Israeli crushed olives, and sliced tomato alone…

   
Posted in: Ayelet Ben-Zvi / bamba / food
8
Apr

The Blessing of Food at Passover

Fellowship Senior Vice President Yael Eckstein recently stopped by a Passover food distribution made possible by the generosity of faithful Fellowship friends, like you!

Posted in: aid / food / Help
28
Jan

Americans Try Israeli Snacks

You’ve probably tried some of the mainstays of both Jewish and Israeli cuisine. But have you ever wondered what snack food tastes like in the Jewish state? In this video, some Americans taste-test Israeli snacks for you!

Posted in: Buzzfeed / cuisine / food
23
Jan

Discovering That Israel Is Yummy

(Photo: wikicommons/ Deror_avi)

(Photo: wikicommons/ Deror_avi)

The Taglit-Birthright program sends many American Jewish young people to Israel to learn about their people’s past and present. Arutz Sheva tells us about this new feature of the program that teaches about the Holy Land’s delicious cuisine, too:

In Taglit’s unique culinary trip, being held as a niche group for the program’s free ten-day visits to Israel, participants learn about Israeli cuisine, visiting organic farms in the desert, boutique wineries and markets, while meeting chefs and generally having a gourmet good time.

A guide on the culinary trip told Arutz Sheva that many of the participants are chefs, and that the goal is to teach them not only about Israeli history, but also “to teach them about the culture through eating, obviously, which is the best thing to do.”

Mckayla, a…

   
Posted in: American Jews / Arutz Sheva / Birthright
8
Apr

Passover Coke: Time Machine in a Bottle

(Photo: flickr/16828091@N04)

(Photo: flickr/16828091@N04)

This time of year is especially joyful for the Jewish people, with Passover around the corner. However, it is a joyful time for aficionados of Coca-Cola, as well.

For Ashkenazi Jews (those descended from the Jews of Central and Eastern Europe, and more than 80% of the world’s Jewish population), the formula of Coca-Cola is changed back to its truly original recipe due to dietary restrictions and is sold in bottles with yellow caps during Passover:

The colored cap means the Coke is made with cane sugar, so it tastes the way it did back in the day, before high fructose corn syrup took over the world. Corn, of course, is kitnyiot, that category of grains and legumes that are forbidden to Ashkenazi Jews during the holiday along with the more obvious foods like bread…

   
Posted in: Ashkenazi / cane sugar / Coca-Cola